COMPETIFY Statement on the FCC’s Comment Deadline Related to High-Capacity Broadband Lines


Today, the first set of comments will be filed at the FCC in the critical high-capacity broadband access proceeding.
Below is a statement from COMPETIFY and the Partners for the Cure:

The largest data collection ever conducted by the FCC and almost a decade of advocacy by those throughout the broadband economy have finally brought us to this long-awaited milestone — the FCC’s review of the high-capacity broadband market. As the incumbents struggle to come to terms with the fact that their own behavior has given them chronic broadband access control, they seem to be trying to blame the high-capacity broadband lines they sell for their very own conduct. Here at COMPETIFY, we have a message for those critical high-speed broadband lines: from powering schools and libraries to 5G to the Internet of Things, we think you are pretty “special.” And today is a major step toward your freedom.

It’s important to note that a very common symptom of chronic broadband access control is confusion. Indeed, the large incumbent companies have gone to great lengths to explain why the lines providing vital broadband service to our businesses, hospitals, schools, government buildings, banks and countless other indispensable institutions are “not very special anymore” and are “obsolete.” By all means, if those interests insist on that point of view, then they should have no concerns whatsoever about this proceeding, as they have obviously moved on to more “special” technologies.  In the meantime, the rest of the broadband economy anxiously awaits the FCC’s efforts to finally cure this diseased marketplace.
COMPETIFY Partners for the Cure include: Ad Hoc Telecommunications Users Committee, Broadband Coalition, BT, Competitive Carriers Association (CCA), Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA), Engine,  INCOMPAS, Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR), Level 3, Open Technology Institute at New America, Public Knowledge, Schools, Health and Libraries Broadband Coalition (SHLB), and Sprint.
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